Posted by admin on June 05, 2023

Each year we photograph Tony nominees, and talk with them about their craft. This year we focused on actors.

 

“Everyone always said theater was incomparable, like there was nothing like it, and I never understood what they meant. When you’re in a room of that many people all experiencing something at the same time, the energy is electrifying, and that has been one of the greatest joys about this experience. It’s intoxicating.” — Jodie Comer

 

New York Times

Posted by admin on June 05, 2023

Jodie Comer, who won an Emmy for her role of a Russian assassin on TV’s “Killing Eve,” is now an Olivier Award-winner and Tony-nominee for her performance in the one-woman play “Prima Facie,” as a London barrister confronting injustice in the legal system with regards to victims of sexual assault. CBS News’ Erin Moriarty talks with Comer, and with playwright Suzie Miller, about the dynamics of the play, the responses from audiences, and how a “scrappy” young woman from Liverpool with no formal training found success on stage.



Jodie Comer is having a very good year. In April, she took home a prestigious Olivier Award for best actress in the play “Prima Facie.” One month later, she was also nominated for a best actress Tony for the same role on Broadway.

When asked if she expected the impact that the play, and her performance, would have, Comer replied, “No, no, I think we were all really taken aback by it, actually. But I remember when we did the first preview in London – and this was the first time performing in front of an audience – a lot of it was crying, like very audibly and very quite loud and unashamed, and very guttural.”

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Posted by admin on June 01, 2023

I have added Screencaps,Stills, and Promos of Jodie in the upcoming video game “Alone in The Dark”. You can also find screencaps of the Interview as well, enjoy!



MISCELLANEOUS > VIDEO GAMES > ALONE IN THE DARK

 

Posted by admin on May 26, 2023

Jodie Comer attended the  2023 Outer Critics Circle Awards in which she won the award of Outstanding Solo Performance for Prima Facie!


 PUBLIC APPEARANCES > 2023 > MAY 25: 2023 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS

 

Posted by admin on May 26, 2023

David Harbour stated that he did a horror game with Jodie Comer, but it wasn’t clear what game it was. That has now been confirmed, as the two actors are the two main characters in the upcoming Alone in the Dark remake.

Who are David Harbour and Jodie Comer in the Alone in the Dark remake?

Harbour plays a detective Edward Carnby, a grizzled private investigator that’s quite visually different from its 1992 counterpart. Writer and game director Mikael Hedberg, who’s known for writing Frictional Games’ first two Amnesia titles and Soma, said that Harbour has a “strong presence” as an actor and can do well in both comical and dramatic situations. Harbour also chimed in about the series and what he likes about Edward.

“I knew of past iterations of the game,” said Harbour. “The video game world is something that I’m very interested in in general. The horror genre specifically. He’s kind of a gruff detective and he’s searching for something, and he’s hard-boiled, but he’s got some humor to him. He’s a bit of a trope or a type, and I like that. And I like the world and sort of how he’s exploring this insanity amidst all the horror and stuff.”

Comer plays Emily Hartwood, the niece of Jeremy Hartwood who has been haunted by a character named the Dark Man. Hedberg said Comer brings a lot of nuance to the character, which makes it easier for players to sympathize with her. Comer also talked about Hartwood and how she tried to juggle all Emily’s complexities.

“I love the mystery of the game, and I love the picture of her,” said Comer. “There was so much about her that I was curious of. There’s a lot of fear within her and a lot of speculation, curiosity, dread, intrigue. There’s a lot about her that’s on edge. Yes, there is the scary element, but then she still has to go on a journey and discover different things. And there should still be room to breathe and have a funny moment or a sarcastic moment or a moment of discovery. So it’s just trying to keep all of those other beats alive amongst the darkness of it all.”

Developer Pieces Interactive also spoke more about the game by talking about the psychological horror that is “more than just jump scares,” the resource-driven gunplay, numerous puzzles, and thick atmosphere. The team also announced the release date for the game, which is October 25 for PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S, and PC.


 

Posted by admin on May 24, 2023

The script for the play “Prima Facie” didn’t languish after landing in Jodie Comer’s inbox

The script for the play “Prima Facie” didn’t languish after landing in Jodie Comer‘s inbox. Fitting for an urgent call for change, the script demanded action. It would not be denied.

“Sometimes when things present themselves, it’s impossible to say no,” says the “Killing Eve” actor. “This piece felt very, very clear to me. There was no hesitation that I felt. Sometimes that kind of guttural instinct really doesn’t lie.”

It didn’t matter that the script represented Comer’s first stage role. No matter that she’d be alone for some 90 minutes, even asked to move her own props. “I read it within the hour and I was like, ‘What have I got to do?’”

Comer leapt in and has found herself winning an Olivier Award in London for her performance and now a Tony nomination for best actress in a play. She’s also raising her fist for women in a work that challenges the status quo.

The script was from Suzie Miller, a former criminal defense and human rights lawyer who uses the one-woman show to illustrate how current laws fail terribly when it comes to sexual assault cases.

Comer plays Tessa Ensler, a young, clever barrister who has developed a knack for getting her male clients off the hook in assault cases until she spends a night drinking with another barrister and he rapes her.

Now, instead of donning a fancy wig as a crown prosecutor, she’s left shaking in the witness box. Why isn’t her evidence presented in a clean, logical package? She must relive her nightmare in court with her motives questioned. And justice may hinge not on the actions, but on whether the perpetrator believed he had consent.

“A woman’s experience of sexual assault does not fit the male-defined system of truth. So it cannot be truth, and therefore there cannot be justice,” she says in the play.

“Prima Facie” — a legal term meaning “on the face of it” — has already created shock waves in England. A filmed version is now compulsory viewing for new judges, and Miller says a judge who saw her play has redrafted the spoken directions juries are given in sexual assault matters. The play has inspired efforts to change British laws.

Both Comer and Miller get hundreds of messages a week from women telling their own stories of assault, some telling about it for the first time, part of a larger movement fueled by #MeToo.

“I’m really trying to savor every second of it because not every piece of work creates this sort of conversation or space,” says Comer. “That is the biggest reward of all —when you are a part of a piece like this and people genuinely feel represented. That it is a source of comfort.”

To win a Tony on June 11, Comer must beat Jessica Chastain in “A Doll’s House,” Jessica Hecht in “Summer, 1976” and Audra McDonald from “Ohio State Murders.”

In terms of sheer physicality, Comer earns it every night. She moves tables together, jumps up on them, sits in rain, uses various voices and performs her own character’s rape.

“It really helped me build my kind of mental resilience, even though I have moments that is absolutely challenged,” she says. “I would say what I’ve learned from this experience is that you have to take care of yourself.”

Miller was inspired to write “Prima Facie” by the years she spent as a lawyer taking statements from hundreds of women who had been sexually assaulted. “Not a single one of them who went to trial actually ended up having a conviction,” she says. “The worst things is they’re all so similar.”

Her first play, “Cross Sections,” was about the homeless and the desperate living in the red-light district in Sydney, Australia, a work which humanized what many believed were throw-away people.

“After I wrote that there was a lightning bolt moment for me, which was, ‘Oh, wow, stories really can make people empathize and think about things,’” she says.

Miller has since taken up the baton of V — the “Vagina Monologues” playwright formerly known as Eve Ensler, who brings social messages to her work. It is no coincidence that Miller named the heroine of “Prima Facie” Tessa Ensler.

The idea of battling the establishment also attracted Comer, an Emmy Award and BAFTA winner, who grew up in the working class of Liverpool and has had to shapeshift in order to succeed, like her character.

When she was auditioning for theater roles, she was rebuffed because she hadn’t attended drama school. “There was a lot of feedback of like, ‘She’s not trained. It’s too big a task,’” she recalls.

The producers of “Prima Facie” didn’t ask her to audition and didn’t mind she hadn’t attended drama school.

“They didn’t see it as this kind of hindrance. And so I guess the stars all aligned at the right time,” Comer says. “This is beyond anything I could have ever dreamed.”

 

The Independent 

Posted by admin on May 22, 2023

Jodie Comer is nominated for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play.

Just over a month ago, Jodie Comer took the stage at the Royal Albert Hall to accept an Olivier Award for her outstanding performance in Prima Facie. Now that she has brought the monumental role to Broadway, is a Tony Award next?

“The relationship with the audience has been so special. The effect that this story is having on people… we receive letters daily,” she told BroadwayWorld’s Richard Ridge. “We’re seeing firsthand how this play is provoking change.”

Below, watch as Jodie chats more about how the play is impacting audiences, the honor of this nomination, and so much more. Plus, check out who she is up against and catch up on all the latest Tony Awards coverage!

 

Posted by admin on May 21, 2023

EXCLUSIVE: Paramount’s Republic Pictures label has acquired North American rights to dystopian drama-thriller The End We Start From, starring BAFTA and Emmy winner Jodie Comer (Killing Eve).

The mid seven-figure pact marks the biggest announced deal for a project on sale at this year’s Cannes market so far. Anton and UTA are handling world sales here on the Riviera.

Comer stars as a woman who, along with her newborn child, must try to find her way home amid an environmental crisis that submerges London in flood waters and sees their young family torn apart in the chaos.

Mahalia Belo (The Long Song) directs the movie, which also stars Joel Fry (Cruella), Mark Strong (Kingsman), Gina McKee (My Policeman), Katherine Waterston (Fantastic Beasts) and Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game).

Based on the novel by Megan Hunter and adapted to screen by Alice Birch (Normal People), pic is produced by Leah Clarke and Adam Ackland (The Mauritanian) for SunnyMarch, Liza Marshall (Temple) for Hera Pictures, Amy Jackson (Aftersun) and Sophie Hunter. Pic is currently in post-production.

Anton, C2 Motion Picture Group, BBC Film, and the BFI financed the film, which will go through Paramount’s Global Content Distribution.

Paramount Chief Content Licensing Officer and Republic Pictures President Dan Cohen said: “What Mahalia Belo has brought to screen from Megan Hunter’s novel is both a harrowing and hopeful examination of human resilience, and we are honored to be a part of the film’s journey to captivating audiences.”

Paramount revived acquisitions play Republic Pictures earlier this year. The historic label was founded in 1935 and shuttered in 1967. Among early projects on the slate are Winter Spring Summer or Fall, starring Jenna Ortega and Percy Hines White, and William Friedkin’s The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial.

The slew of strong packages announced pre-market prompted hopes of energetic deal-making in Cannes. Things are slowly coming into focus. Domestic deal-making has been sluggish to date, with streamers (and global deals) largely absent from the fray, leaving the door open for international indie buyers to take their pick. We hear a number of projects are being sold well internationally and a couple of the bigger festival titles are starting to generate heat for North America.

We told you about the biggest deal finalized here so far: Sony’s big splash for the Paddington threequel, though that project wasn’t strictly on sale in Cannes and the pact was largely lined up ahead of the market. Neon made the first announced North American deal for a festival movie with Pablo Berger’s Robot Dreams and Sony Classics announced a deal for animated doc They Shot The Piano Player. There was a fevered report of Prime Video working on a UK deal for Firebrand, but that all rights pact was put in place last year.

Executive producers on The End We Start From are Benedict Cumberbatch for SunnyMarch, Jodie Comer, Mark Strong, Sébastien Raybaud, Fanny Soulier, Pieter Engels, Kate Maxwell for Anton, Dave Caplan (Babylon) and Jason Cloth (Joker) for C2 Motion Picture Group, Eva Yates and Claudia Yusef for BBC Film, and Lizzie Francke for the BFI.

Posted by admin on May 19, 2023

Jodie Comer attended the  89th Annual Drama League Awards today in New York. Photos have been added to our gallery, enjoy!


 

Posted by admin on May 15, 2023

The ‘Killing Eve’ actress made her West End and Broadway debut in the role, in which she is solo on stage for the entirety of the drama.

In the play Prima Facie, Jodie Comer is alone on stage for the full length of the show’s 100 minutes, starting as a brash, bloviating barrister, then turning to a quieter, more vulnerable woman trying to find justice for herself in the very legal system that had previously propped her up.

Before making her West End debut in the play last year, the Killing Eve star says she hadn’t appeared on stage (aside from a play in a “very, very small theater” in Scotland when she was 16 years old). And so taking on this marathon role not only required intense dedication and memorization, but also a recalibration of her acting style in order to emote to an 800-plus seat theater, rather than to the camera.

In the drama, written by Suzie Miller, Comer plays Tessa Ensler, a talented, young lawyer who defends individuals accused of sexual assault and then goes through the justice system herself as a victim of rape. Comer has been playing Tessa since April 2022 on the West End (where she won the Olivier Award for Best Actress) and has now carried the role to Broadway for an 12-week run that began this April. One year in, she says the role has made a deep impact on her life.

“I realized that I was quite fearful last year of a lot of things, especially in my ability to do this,” Comer said. “And I think that actually, through this experience, I’ve been able to transform that into a sense of trust, which is a really nice feeling.”

Once she gets through the final eight weeks of the run, the Free Guy star says she’s open to doing more theater, but she notes that she’s “intrigued to see” what kind of role could bring her back, after performing in such a challenging, but “exhilarating” play.

Comer, who is Tony nominated for her portrayal, spoke with The Hollywood Reporter about why she decided to take on the role, how she prepared for it and how its changed throughout the year.

What did you think when you were first approached about doing this role?

I thought that this was mighty in every sense of the word. I wasn’t actually sure if I needed to audition or not. So I was also thinking that it may have been sent to many actresses and whoever was going to do it would be the luckiest person alive. But I also just didn’t know how I would get to a point of executing it. I knew it was going to be a challenge and it was going to change me as a person. I was looking at like 96 pages of dialogue and thinking “How on earth would you be on stage alone and do this?” so I was really overwhelmed, but just blown away by the script and the journey that I would go on in order to get to a place of performing that eight shows a week. I was deeply moved by it. It felt very important.

 

Did you end up having to audition for it?

No, it was actually given to me. I asked my agent “When do I have to audition?” And she said that James Bierman, the producer, and Suzie Miller, the writer, had said if it was something I connected with, Suzie would love to chat with me. And I remember it was the first lockdown and I was in Liverpool with my family and Suzie was in Australia and we jumped on a call and we were on the phone for like two hours. I just knew then that there was no question. And I also knew that if I saw another actress do this, I would regret it for the rest of my life. I think that’s always a good indicator as to whether to do something or not.

How did you get into the character of Tessa?

There was so much about her that I related to because of where she’s from, her family. Just being from Liverpool and the characteristics of the people who are from there, people I know, people who are in my own life. I think a big thing that I had to kind of embrace was her intellect and sense of self and power that she held and self-confidence. That felt…not foreign to me, but I almost had to embrace those parts of myself in order to find her. And how she commanded the space and the confidence that she carries in her execution. I think I definitely do have that within myself, and I’ve come to appreciate that a lot more through her, which is funny. I think that you can, more often than not, learn from your characters. It’s a transaction. It’s like, you teach them something and they always leave you with some sort of insight into your own life.

 

In the play, you’re not only speaking as Tessa, but you’re also acting out all the lines of dialogue around her. How did you prepare for and get to the place of being ready to perform that eight shows a week?

We started rehearsals in March [2022] and I had started learning the dialogue the November before, because I really wanted to be off book by the time I got into the rehearsal room. And then Justin, our director, got me up on my feet on the first day. It was kind of all systems go, and I hadn’t been in the rehearsal room a lot. I’d only been in a rehearsal room once before when I was really young, and it was all very new to me, and I was incredibly intimidated and nervous. But it was just about being in the rehearsal room and getting up on our feet and working through it and playing around with things.

How does it feel now, performing this role in front of audiences every night?

Exhilarating. It feeds my soul in such a big way. I think it is absolutely difficult and challenging, but it really invigorates me. I feel like I’m having a conversation with 800-plus people every night and getting to see how it moves them. And I think in theater, the energy is very kinetic, and it’s so addictive. I just feel so, so lucky that I’m able to be part of this huge puzzle of people who brought this together. It’s rare that you’re blessed with a piece of material and a role that challenges you in this way. So I’m just trying to soak up every second of it all.

You’ve now been with the play through its West End run and now on Broadway. Has the role changed at all or evolved during that process?

 

Absolutely. I think now it’s just kind of sunk into me. The material, Tessa. I feel like I’m finding new things. I also feel very much changed by this experience. And I think we can change so much within a year. So I feel like through my own evolution, Tess is also evolving just through different things every night that I find and think, “Oh God, I’ve never done that before” or “That felt good, and why didn’t I think of that last year?” That’s what I was actually really excited about being in the rehearsal room [this time]. We got a few weeks before we went into tech when we came to New York and just had that constant kind of discovery of going “Oh, wow, you know, why didn’t we think of this last year?” and it’s just because you’re having to think about things less.

Can you talk more about how the experience has changed you? 

I think a lot of it is deeply personal, that I don’t necessarily feel the need to speak about, but I feel like a woman. I feel like I’ve stepped into my womanhood. I feel like I have so much more trust within myself and who I am. I realized that I was quite fearful last year of a lot of things, especially in my ability to do this. And I think that actually, through this experience, I’ve been able to transform that into a sense of trust, which is a really nice feeling. That’s not to say I don’t have my moments, but I just feel like I have a clearer sense of who I am.

With such a heavy subject matter, are you able to leave the role at the theater or do you carry it with you?

 

I do a little cool down on stage afterwards and kind of consciously let go of it. Just the practical movement of stretching your body and trying to let go of anything that you’re holding on to is really helpful. My mornings are a bit slow. Sometimes I wake up and I feel like I was kind of hit by a train. It’s generally okay. You just have to make sure that you take care of yourself because I think it’s in those moments when you slip up with those things that you can feel it a little bit more. But anything I can kind of help myself, a voice cool down, body cool down. I come home, and I’m sticking my head in the fridge for about an hour-and-a-half [laughs]. That sounds weird. I mean, just more that I snack nonstop.

That makes sense. You’re on stage for so long, and you’re also running around and jumping on tables. 

Yeah, you’ve got to refuel.