Welcome to Jodie Comer Fan your online resource for everything Jodie Come. Jodie is best known for roles in her hit TV Show "Killing Eve", Doctor Foster, and Thirteen. We aim to bring you all the latest news and images relating to Jodie's acting career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. Please take a look around and be sure to visit again to stay up-to-date on the latest news, photos and more on Jodie.
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Killing Eve’s Jodie Comer makes the ‘intimidating’ leap into movies with Free Guy

Comer takes her first leading lady role in a major Hollywood production with this summer’s Free Guy. And it’s just the start.

With Killing Eve drawing to a close next year, Jodie Comer, who made a name for herself on the BBC drama, now embarks on a new era as the star of her first Hollywood movie – even though, technically, she already made her mainstream film debut.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker director J.J. Abrams had seen Comer’s work as chic, sharp-tongued assassin Villanelle and had to have her for a small but splashy role in his 2019 film, that of the mysterious mother of rising Jedi Rey (Daisy Ridley).

“It was spectacular,” Comer says of the part over the phone. “But I had to keep that a secret for a long, long, long time.”

The 28-year-old Liverpool-born actress admits she hadn’t seen any of the Star Wars films but felt the weight of being involved, even in a small capacity. “That’s a beast of its own,” she remarks. The appearance required just a day’s worth of work as she filmed flashback sequences of Rey’s mother and father, the latter a strand-cast clone of Darth Sidious (Ian McDiarmid), losing their lives to protect their daughter from her galaxy-conquering grandfather. Comer calls it “the most peculiar, incredible experience.”

“Hearing the detail that goes into the makeup and the costumes, it was so eye-opening,” she elaborates. “Speaking about green screen and visual effects, when I got Star Wars, I was like, ‘They’ll probably be a lot that I don’t see.’ But these kind of figures, their mouths move and they were remote-controlled and there was so much there that you didn’t have to imagine.”

Call it a solid introduction for Comer, who would soon face what she considers a more intimidating experience as the leading lady opposite Ryan Reynolds in Free Guy, another big-budget studio feature.

Jodie Comer as Rey's mom in Star Wars The Rise of Skywalker
Jodie Comer as Rey’s mother in ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.’
| CREDIT: LUCASFILM LTD.

Despite what one might think, nobody in the industry knew of Comer when she first started making the rounds in Hollywood to convince studio executives she should be booked and busy. Killing Eve‘s first season was on the air at the time, but the show hadn’t yet amassed such a following as it has today. In between takes on Free Guy‘s Boston set in June 2019, when the production took over cross streets near the Waterfront, filmmaker Shawn Levy admits he hadn’t seen any of the show before casting Comer to play two roles in his film: Milly, a video game developer, and Molotovgirl, Milly’s gunslinging avatar inside the popular game Free City, in which Reynolds’ plays Guy, a background character who becomes aware of his virtual existence.

The day after Comer wrapped on Killing Eve season 2 before Christmas 2018, she flew to New York for a chemistry read with Reynolds. The flight from the U.K. proved to be “a long way to think about all the ways in which I could possibly f— up this meeting,” Comer recalls. But the audition felt like a relaxed workshop with Levy and her soon-to-be costar working through scenes. She flew back home the next day, and a few weeks later brought the news she had landed her first leading role in a big-budget Hollywood movie.

“Casting is always tricky,” Levy remembers of the audition process. “We had the luxury of lots of people putting their hand up that are impossibly talented, not the least of which being Jodie Comer, who just anchors this movie in a way that I think is going to really blow people away. She’s so fantastic.”

“I just remember so vividly how terrified I was when I started the job [compared] to how I felt when I finished,” Comer says. “I’d never done a film of this size with the caliber of people. I felt like a very small part of something very big, and I always had this insecurity of having come from television. I think I created this idea that film is a completely different beast when actually you walk up to set every day and you prepare in the same way.”

Free Guy, also featuring Stranger Things‘ Joe Keery and Jojo Rabbit‘s Taika Waititi, introduced her to a lot of firsts. Though she had come equipped with that experience on Star Wars, the movie was the first time she acted heavily opposite green screen. (“I feel like I rely so much on what other actors are giving me that when you are now put in a green box and told to imagine something flying towards you, that’s a totally different skill.”) It was the most physically demanding role she’s had so far, even factoring in Killing Eve. (“A lot of people think Killing Eve is very physical, but it really isn’t all that much.”) In one sequence, Comer and Reynolds simulate jumping through a window on a motorcycle as she fires at enemies.

Free Guy
Jodie Comer as Molotovgirl in ‘Free Guy.’
| CREDIT: ALAN MARKFIELD/20TH CENTURY STUDIOS

The film was also the first time Comer got deep into playing video games. Levy compares the virtual world of Free City to Grand Theft Auto in that it’s an open-world space where players can interact with each other online through their characters, steal cars, go on shooting sprees, and generally wreak havoc. Comer got her hands on a PlayStation as “homework,” with Marvel’s Spider-Man being her favorite that she tried.

“I liked the freedom of swinging from buildings and wasting time,” she says. “But something like Grand Theft Auto is super stressful for me… I take games way too seriously.”

Looking back, though it feels like a lifetime ago that Comer made this film before the COVID-19 pandemic delayed all of movie kind, she sees Free Guy as “a real warm hug of an introduction into the industry” after Levy and Reynolds created an environment that encouraged her to share ideas and even improv – which is not her “comfortable spot,” she admits. “I like a good ol’ script.”

Free Guy, one of the summer’s few theater-only blockbusters, premiering this Aug. 13, is only the beginning for Comer as she charts out her next moves. Soon she will be seen opposite Ben Affleck and Matt Damon in The Last Duel, where she actually gets to act opposite her Star Wars colleague Adam Driver in the 14th-century France-set drama from director Ridley Scott. Then, she’ll play the wife of Joaquin Phoenix‘s Napoleon Bonaparte in Kitbag, another Scott production.

“I think what I’m really enjoying about film is it’s a very different experience than television in that you have a fully fleshed out thing in front of you that you can really dive into the material and know where you are from beginning to end, which is a new experience,” Comer says. “Killing Eve is ever changing and ever growing. So, I think I’m really enjoying that aspect, to have the freedom to work with different people and it not take as long out of the year.”

“I’d also love to do theater,” she adds. “I’ve read an incredible theater script at the moment which I really, really want to do. I’m really hungry to throw myself into new territory.” She’s off to a good start.

Jodie attends the 2021 Bafta TV Awards

Tonight Jodie attended the 2021 BAFTA Awards looking stunning as always, I have added images to our gallery enjoy!


Jodie Comer for Hunger Magazine

Fresh off the set of their upcoming project ‘Help’, the Emmy-winning actress talks to friend and fellow Liverpool native Stephen Graham about destiny, playing Scousers and getting the call from Hollywood.

How cool is Jodie Comer? Prodigious talent and an enviable screen magnetism have resulted in an Emmy and a BAFTA for her explosive performance as a psychopathic Russian assassin, arguably one of the most complex, multilayered characters to grace the small screen in years. There is a fearless honesty to her acting that seems to set her apart from her co-stars no matter what role she’s playing, from Ivy in Thirteen to Lizzie in The White Princess, and then of course, Villanelle in Killing Eve. Her co-workers attest to her being a right laugh, down-to-earth and generous to a fault on set. And she looks killer in a clown suit.

Now 28, Comer has been acting professionally since she was 13, but it was a small part in the BBC drama Good Cop, opposite acclaimed actor Stephen Graham, that kick-started what is shaping up to be an incredibly exciting career, one in which she is this year making the leap from small- to big-screen lead. Free Guy, an action comedy in which she stars alongside Ryan Reynolds, will finally be released this summer, with The Last Duel – a historical drama starring Hollywood heavyweights Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and Adam Driver and directed by Ridley Scott – following in the autumn. Comer is also Ridley’s choice to play Empress Joséphine, opposite Joaquin Phoenix, in his upcoming Napoleon epic Kitbag, so he clearly thinks she’s pretty cool too.

But her most recent gig is Help, a story that shines a light on the tragic impact of coronavirus on care homes in the UK at the start of the pandemic, and one that reunites her with her friend and supporter Stephen Graham. Having recently wrapped filming on set in their hometown of Liverpool, the pair catch up on their history and swap set stories, sharing personal experiences of working in Hollywood

Stephen Graham: Do you remember how we met?
Jodie Comer: Of course I do, it changed my life forever. It was a lifetime ago now, but I remember it so well. We were filming Good Cop. I was only filming for one day and I remember how much you took me under your wing, and then it was from there that you introduced me to Jane [Epstein, Graham’s agent]. To think, that one day really did change everything for me, in the fact that you gave me a little nudge in the right direction. Because I don’t like to think where I would be if you hadn’t done that.

SG: I believe in the balances of fortune and fate. I feel like it was predestined and you would have gone on to do what you do, but I was just a little part of that journey. But I just remember being blown away by your talent in rehearsal. And I knew I was going to have to speak to my agent about you.
JC: Well, I think I was just so eager to get on my mark, know my lines and be there for everyone else who was doing a much bigger job than me. I had such a tiny part in it, but I remember you made it such a collaboration. And then I was on the train a couple of weeks later with my old agent, going to an audition that I really didn’t want to go to, and you called and said, “Don’t go to it – come and meet Jane.” And I didn’t go to the audition, I met Jane, which is very naughty. But it was meant to be.

SG: Yeah, it was. But before that, when did you first think, “Oh I really want to do this acting thing”? Was it at school? How did it come about?
JC: I remember it so vividly. It was at the Liverpool Theatre Festival. I was probably about 12. I was doing a piece written by a local playwright about the Hillsborough disaster. It was quite emotional, and I was crying before I’d even introduced myself.

That was the first time my dad had seen me act. Before I went on, he was like, “Just do your best.” But inside he was thinking, “Fucking hell, she’s going to get up there and I don’t know if she’s going to be any good. I want her to be good, but I don’t know if she’s going to be any good.” And then I remember doing it, and I remember seeing his face. And I thought, “If I’ve impressed my dad, maybe I’m all right.”

I’d done a radio play, working with actors from soaps, and they were the ones who said, “You could do this as a career.” It had never entered my head that this was an occupation. This was something I did on the weekend with my mates that I just loved. But winning the festival – and seeing how proud my dad was – I think that was a big turning point for me.

SG: We’re very similar in that respect. Like me, your family is massively important to you. I know how close you are. You’ve talked about the support from your mum and dad and how they enabled you to follow your dream.
JC: I remember [when I was young] when my dad drove me to an audition in Leeds, and I was sitting in the car, practising my lines, and my character’s swearing. And my dad was like, “I’m driving my 12-year-old daughter to an audition in Leeds, and she’s telling me to fuck off. What am I encouraging her to do?” But even though they didn’t have a clue about the acting world, they could see how much I wanted to do it, and they’ve just been so proud and given me the space to make my own decisions. My dad is always like, “Trust yourself, young Skywalker.”

SG: So when was the moment you thought to yourself, “Hang on, this could be my career”?
JC: God, I don’t know. I don’t know if I’ve ever had that conscious moment. I feel like each experience brings a newfound confidence or certainty with it. When I got Silent Witness, I was like, “Yes!” I felt like I’d proved myself. And My Mad Fat Diary was a big one. I remember going, “Wow, I’m going to be in something for six whole episodes.” And then with Thirteen, that was my first lead, and I was like, “Wow, this is a big responsibility.” And then obviously Killing Eve… I don’t know how you feel about this, whether you have one specific thing. But for me it’s like each step I take gives me something. As opposed to it being one kind of euphoric “this is it” moment.

SG: Yeah, you’re constantly learning, aren’t you? Gaining that education as you go along. And experience comes from actually being on the job. Because you never went down that drama-school route, did you? So all of your learning, and all of the knowledge you’re gaining, is primarily through experience. I think that makes you one of the most instinctive actors I’ve ever worked with.
JC: But so are you. I think that’s why we enjoy working together so much. But yeah, I think you’re right in that sense, because when I think back to being in audition rooms, I’d be in rooms with girls who had, like, three pages of notes. And I’d be thinking, well I haven’t done that kind of preparation, everything is always kind of on how I feel. But I guess everyone has their process, right? And you need to try to not look at what everyone else is doing and worry that you’re not doing the same.

SG: Yeah, of course. Drama schools are great and are excellent places for people to learn about the craft. But as soon as you get on set, it’s a completely different ball game. You can’t teach the minimalism that is needed when you’re on camera.
JC: No, you can’t teach how to feel. And when I was very young, it was always at the surface, and I just never knew how to control it. But I know that you’re the same, I’ve seen it on The Virtues. But even on Help I saw the way you access your vulnerability. I think it is incredible and was amazing to see up close.

SG: Help was a wonderful experience, and it was lovely for me to share that with you because of where we’ve both come from. We’re both kind of paving the way in our own journeys. In Help, you play Scouse, and I don’t think you’ve done that since the first time we worked together.
JC: No, I haven’t. Starting out, apart from Good Cop, I was always asked to change my accents in auditions. Which was fine – I always felt like accents helped me separate myself from my character. But there was definitely something lovely playing my own accent and showing the kind of woman that’s a part of me. And also the kind of woman I know so well. I found it quite exposing, actually, doing my own accent in such a bare, stripped-back way. But it was also something I really enjoyed, it felt like a celebration.

SG: I can’t wait for the world to see you playing this aspect of yourself in your true accent. Because to me, and I’m not just saying it because you’re like a little sister to me, it’s as powerful as Carol White in Cathy Come Home or Julie Walters in Boys from the Blackstuff – those really powerful, strong, visceral, fucking guttural women. But you’ve done it in such a modern way.
And it’s exciting to see, as it’s such a departure from all these other characters you’ve played, especially the magnificent Villanelle, for whom you’ve just had a fourth BAFTA nomination. How did that come about and how much did you help create that character?
JC: Well, I remember I’d seen Fleabag, and was obsessed with Phoebe [Waller-Bridge], and then, lo and behold, episode one of Killing Eve came through on a script. You can tell something’s special just by the writing, and I’d never, ever read anything like Phoebe’s script. And when creating it, we all felt a buzz, but didn’t quite know what it was going to be. And then it came to life in a way that none of us had ever imagined. And for me personally, I think what Villanelle has taught me is to be a little bit fearless.

Before I played Villanelle, a crew show was the most intimidating thing for me, even though the crew are on my side. I would always be so conscious of myself and my body. But with Villanelle I thought, if I’m going to fall on my face, I’m just going to get back up and try something else.

And I think that’s still in me going forward – to take risks and not be so self-conscious, and I’ve really enjoyed finding the freedom in that. And I’ve learnt that things can be flamboyant and in your face, but you always need to try to find where the truth is rooted.

“Each experience brings a new-found confidence or certainty with it… Each step I take gives me something”
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SG: Yes, and we can tell how much fun you’re having while also completely believing that character, because you made it your own.
JC: There’s a scary amount of myself in there. Part of the whole collaboration with Phoebe on the first season was that she would write while watching the rushes – writing in and amplifying things I was doing. But we were constantly having to walk a tightrope of how much empathy we gave her, or how much we let people in. Because people are so invested in her and her relationship with Eve. At the beginning she was just this psychopath assassin, but she’s so much more than that now. You can’t put her into a box anymore.

SG: That’s interesting that you say a lot of your character is in her, and I can see that – you do have to find a way in. Did the accent and costumes help you find the character? I’ve got a weird thing where it’s all about the shoes for me, and once I find them shoes, I can find a walk.
JC: My favourite thing was that whenever you got a new costume, you’d come and find me and do your little walk around the room in your costume and say, “It’s boss, isn’t it?” It was my favourite thing.

But yeah, I have an amazing accent coach, Budgie. I remember in the last season, Villanelle had to do a Scottish accent. And we spent a week doing this accent, really pushing it to the extremes. And then we’d be like, “Oh no, that’s a bit too Lorraine Kelly.” With the accents, I always find the best way is to push it to as far as you possibly can, and then when the moment comes, it’s a lot easier to bring it back. But you’re amazing with accents as well – do you have a coach?

SG: No, but I do work with coaches occasionally. For me, in the beginning, when I was playing a lot of Scouse roles, I could feel that I was possibly going to be typecast. Like that was going to be me for the rest of my days. So I did make a conscious decision to try to do things that weren’t just me being Scouse. But then I decided to go back to playing Scouse, because if I’m really honest, I want kids to see and hear me on the telly and go, “Well if he can do it, maybe I can too.” Because there weren’t many Scousers on the telly at that particular time.
JC: That’s so true. I remember, when I was younger, going for a theatre job, which I did end up getting but afterwards the director told me I was the only girl from the northwest who had gone in for it. And before I auditioned, she questioned whether I could even change my accent.

SG: Yeah, for me it was Martin Scorsese who had faith in me and gave me that opportunity to play the part of Al Capone. He didn’t have any reservations, he just offered me to do the part. And I did it, and at first I was very nervous, but I proved that I could do it and had a lovely time doing it. I’m not sure if I would have got that same opportunity over here in the UK, if I’m being honest. That’s actually a nice segue to the film you’ve just done with Ryan Reynolds – your first Hollywood film. Isn’t it amazing that we’re two kids from Liverpool having this conversation?
JC: [Laughing.] Yeah

SG: So how did you feel when you first went over there and when you were on set? What’s the difference between the little stuff you’ve been doing in England and the big Hollywood movies? I get asked this question a lot, so it’s lovely to ask someone else.
JC: I remember getting there and just being like, “This is so much bigger than me, this is a monster of a production.” My character is in a video game, so a lot of it was about visuals, and I’d never really done any green screen. So then you’re having to spend the entire day imagining what it is that you’re looking at or acting with. And doing it with conviction. Superhero movies have never been something that I’d usually gravitated towards. But after doing Free Guy, I had a whole new-found respect for actors who predominantly work on them. Because I rely so much on what the other actor is giving me. So to have that missing was really hard.

But the team was incredible. Ryan is just stupidly nice, wonderful. And Shawn Levy, the director, was the same. You know what it’s like, whoever is leading the cast usually sets the precedent – if they’re an arsehole, then everyone is going to feel in a bad mood, it just rolls downhill. But with Ryan and Shawn leading it, it was just the most joyous set to be on. And very nurturing.

SG: And you’ve just done another whopper, whopper film, with a whopper director. Ridley Scott, the legend that is Ridley Scott.
JC: Sir Ridley Scott!

SG: Sir Ridley Scott, of course, yes, Sir Ridley Scott. And you got to work with three wonderful actors on the show. Matt Damon, who I think is fantastic. And Ben Affleck. Oh, and that lovely lad, Adam Driver, he’s fucking phenomenal.
JC: Yeah, he’s incredible.

“With Villanelle I thought, if I’m going to fall on my face, I’m just going to get back up and try something else”
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SG: So, what was it like then, sis, when you got the call? Was it exciting or are you just getting used to them now, like, “Yeah, another Hollywood movie… ”?
JC: No, no! For The Last Duel, there was actually this whole confusion. I was told Ridley really wanted to meet me, but that I couldn’t read the script. And then we were chatting away in his office – you know he’s a Geordie? – and he asked me what I thought about the script! And I told him I hadn’t been given it and he was like, “What?” Then he said, “Right, I’m going to give it to you, I want you to go away, read it and let me know what you think.”

I thought the script was brilliant. I thought the way they’d approached the subject matter was phenomenal, and I just wanted to bite the hands off them, you know, for the opportunity to work with Ridley, and Adam and Matt and Ben and Nicole [Holofcener, co-writer of the screenplay]. It’s just a really, really clever script. And filming was just incredible. Ridley works in such a particular way, he has four or five cameras rolling the whole time. And he knows exactly what he wants, he’s meticulous. And he gives you the space to do what you want.

SG: Did you do many takes or does he know what he wants, and when he gets it, he’s like, “Yeah, we’ve got it”?
JC: When he’s happy, he’ll ask you if there’s anything you want to do. I think he really enjoys you giving him something new, he likes to see you playing around, and maybe giving him something he didn’t initially think of. It was amazing being able to have four cameras on you, and two takes, one if you want to play around. You’re not doing it for 12 hours, you know?

SG: Yeah!
JC: You know what it’s like – sometimes you’re doing it all day! But I felt so lucky to be a part of it, and I also feel like I really grew up on that set. There was something in me that really kind of shifted. I read an interview recently with an incredible actress, of my age, called Olivia Cooke. She said, “A fairy isn’t going to die if you say that you’re good at your job.” It’s so true, you should feel comfortable about saying, “I feel like I did a good job.”

SG: Of course, yeah. And actually, that brings me to another question I’ve been wanting to ask you. Has there ever been a moment in your career where you felt that kind of imposter syndrome and that kind of old working-class mentality? Have you ever felt that or has it never affected you?
JC: I think I feel it all the time! Because you go to America and you do these huge things, and then you think, “But I’m from the UK. I’m from a little city called Liverpool and, you know, I live with my mum and dad.” And I feel like you make everything very small. When they’re actually not. But I always feel lucky to be there when I look around at everyone else, knowing all the stuff they’ve done. You know that people are at different points in their life, but you still feel it. But the only space in which I never feel it is when the cameras are rolling. When we’re about to go for a take, it just disappears. Because then I feel like I am where I’m meant to be.

SG: I asked because, you know, I’ve had that as well, throughout my career, right up to when I was lucky enough to do The Irishman. I had a really nice scene with Al Pacino, and I started to get a little bit panicky, thinking, “I can’t do this, it’s Al Pacino.” I had to phone Hannah [Walters, Graham’s wife], and I was like, “Hannah, I don’t know if I can do this,” and she was like, “What do you mean?” I went, “My arse has gone numb. Honest to God, I’ve been to the toilet about six times, my bottle has gone, I don’t know if I can do it.” And she was like, “Stephen, behave yourself,” and I went, “Hannah, it’s Al fucking Pacino!”
JC: [Nodding.] It’s Al Pacino.

SG: And I went, “You don’t understand, I’ve had posters of the man on my wall since I was a kid. When I told my dad I wanted to be an actor, we went to the video shop and we got three fucking films, and one of them was The Godfather. Do you understand, it’s Al Pacino?” And she was going, “Stephen, it’s alright, you’re meant to be there.” And I had to believe I’d earned the right to be there, to just enjoy it. She talked me down and I went back in, and he was wonderful, they were all wonderful. But what you said before really resonated with me – there’s a moment where you feel like there’s a growth. I felt like that on This Is England. But on The Irishman, I was kind of like, “OK, relax, this is where you’re meant to be.”
JC: Yeah, I think with each job, it’s about finding the space to feel like you’re meant to be there, you’re meant to be doing this. And then for me, you look at the people you’re working with, who you’re inspired by, who you look up to, and then you get on set with them and they’re just like everybody else. They’re there to do the same job as you, and be as present as you, with you, in the room. And it becomes more important to me, who I collaborate with and work with. Because I feel like, since I’ve never been to drama school, I’m constantly learning from the people I’m surrounded by. And I feel so lucky to have been surrounded by the likes of you, basically. Everyone needs a Stephen Graham in their life.

SG: Aww, you’re such a joy on set. As a person, you’re so gregarious and your sense of humour is fucking brilliant. And what I love about you is that you treat every single person on set exactly the same, be it an executive producer or one of the lovely girls who makes tea. And I think that’s a beautiful quality to have.
JC: Oh, thank you, Stephen. Well, as you get older and do more, you become so much more aware of how important everyone is. When we wrapped on Help, I felt so emotional, saying goodbye to everyone, because I feel like what Help really solidified for me was the importance of teamwork. You know, we worked six-day weeks, not a lot of time, not a lot of money. Really heavy stuff, night shoots, one takes, and Mark Wolf, our incredible DOP, was like a third person in the room with us at all times. And I just thought, “Wow, this doesn’t work if we’re not all connected.” But I just love being on set. You know what it’s like, it’s just such good energy.

SG: Yeah. I think it’s fair to say we both love being on set.
JC: Yeah. Together, preferably.

SG: Yeah, definitely together.

The Community Issue is out now.

BAFTA TV Awards 2021

Jodie has been nominated in the 2021 BAFTAS, Huge congrats to Jodie!

She has been nominated for Leading Actress in Killing Eve! *fingers crossed*

 

Killing Eve: Stars Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh say fourth series will be the last – as producer warns fans to ‘buckle up’

Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh have won numerous awards for their performances as Villanelle and Eve Polastri in Killing Eve.

Killing Eve also features Fiona Shaw as MI5 boss Carolyn Martens and Kim Bodnia as Villanelle’s handler Konstantin.

Production on the fourth and final season will begin in the early summer in the UK and across Europe, with the series launching on BBC One and BBC iPlayer in 2022.

Oh described the show as one of her “greatest experiences” and said she was looking forward “to diving back into Eve’s remarkable mind soon”.

She added: “I’m so grateful for all cast and crew who have brought our story to life and to the fans who have joined us and will be back for our exciting and unpredictable fourth and final season.”

2021 Golden Globe Awards: Nominations

The Golden Globe Awards Nominations have been announced and Jodie has been nominated for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series for her work in Killing Eve, huge congrats to Jodie!

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
OLIVIA COLMAN THE CROWN
JODIE COMER KILLING EVE

EMMA CORRIN THE CROWN

LAURA LINNEY OZARK

SARAH PAULSON RATCHED

Jodie Comer Shares The Simple Routine She Swears By For Glowing Skin.

On her role as a skincare ambassador

“For me, everything is about integrity, including my acting,” Jodie told R29. “I’ve got to believe in something if I’m going to put my time into it and I was blown away by Noble Panacea’s ethos and attitude towards what beauty is.” The brand was founded by Sir Fraser Stoddart, the 2016 Nobel Laureate for Chemistry, and champions active ingredients such as probiotics, which strengthen the skin’s barrier, and acids for gentle exfoliation. “There is so much science that has gone into these products and I think that’s authentic,” said Jodie.

On the simple skincare routine that makes all the difference
Since working with the brand, Jodie has cut back on stockpiling hyped skincare products and now opts for a more minimal routine. “I actually feel embarrassed when I look at my cosmetic cupboard and I see all the products that I’ve bought because there’s always something new,” she said. Cleansing is the lynchpin in her morning and evening routine. “I always cleanse my skin,” she added. “If I’m filming and wearing a lot of makeup, I prefer something with a creamy, thicker texture and I love using a cleansing brush.”

What follows is super simple yet effective. “My skin actually gets clogged quite easily, so in the morning I just use the Radiant Resilience Moisturiser,” a mix of skin-repairing probiotics, pollution-busting minerals and soothing plant extracts. “What the brand champions is using the products in steps, so I also love the Brilliant Prime Radiance Serum when I’m working out,” which contains bakuchiol (nature’s answer to retinol) and exfoliating glycolic acid. “I hate my skin being dry but I don’t want too much on my skin,” added Jodie. “Then, I always use SPF 50,” something Jodie’s facialist, Jasmina Vico, has instilled in her. “Jasmina can be naughty and nice when it comes to my skin,” continued Jodie, who treats herself to the odd facial when she’s in London. “They can be a little bit painful but that’s when I know it’s doing my skin some good. I’d much rather get all the gunk out of my face.”

In the evening, Jodie speaks highly of the Overnight Recharge Cream. “But I try not to put too much on my face at night,” she said. “I really like rose or lavender water – something that will give my skin a little hydration boost. I try and keep it simple, and I find that if I change things up too much, I don’t notice a positive difference on my skin. I leave things like retinol to the experts because I feel like something could go horribly wrong.

On being mindful when it comes to beauty
“Now, I’m more mindful about what I’m actually putting on my skin and into my body, and it helps that Noble Panacea ingredients are all clean,” said Jodie. All products are 100% fragrance-free, hypoallergenic and formulated without mineral oil, petrolatum, alcohol and paraffin, to name a few ingredients which may have the potential to irritate sensitive skin. “This never used to be important to me but it is now,” added Jodie. “I’m obsessed with the Overnight Recharge Creamin particular. When you wake up in the morning your skin is so moisturised and glowy and it starts you off on the right foot. I love the consistency of it, too. I hate it when a cream just dissolves into your skin but you don’t want it to be too thick either.”

Jodie’s approach to skincare has changed since learning more about efficacy and sustainability. “I feel like we always just slap our moisturiser on and can be quite rough with our face when washing it,” said Jodie. “I travel a lot with work, too,” she continued, “so the Recharge Cream’s small packages [each dose is individually wrapped to protect the product from light and air] are really useful and there’s zero waste.” The brand recently partnered with TerraCycle to source materials that are 100% nationally recyclable.

On the makeup products she can’t live without and the top tips she’s picked up on set
“Whenever anyone uses an Hourglass foundation on me, I love it. Also their highlighter palettes are so good,” revealed Jodie. “I also really like the Hourglass Hidden Corrective Concealer sticks but I like to warm the product up on my hand first and then apply it, as if you layer it, it can be quite thick.”
Jodie works with makeup artist Alex Babsky a lot and has learned some clever makeup hacks. “Recently, Alex was doing an eyeliner look on me that was kind of like a cat eye but so subtle and gorgeous. I always want to do a little flick but it always ends up on my forehead. I’m always trying to level it out and it always gets bigger and bigger. He gave me a top tip, though: start it from the centre of your eye and then wing it out, starting with a pencil and then a felt-tip liquid liner.”

“Another tip I learned is that once your lips are done, going around them with a little bit of concealer makes them seem a bit sharper and fuller,” said Jodie. “I really love a white or off-white eyeliner in my waterline to make my eyes look bigger, too, that’s a really nice touch. I also don’t put any mascara on my lower lashes, as it makes my eyes look smaller. But skin prep is also important. Whenever Hung Vanngo does my makeup, there is a face wash and a cleanser and two sheet masks and all of these things beforehand!”
On her iconic blonde hair
“I’m so lazy with my hair,” said Jodie, “but I love Olaplex and that’s the shampoo that I use.” Then it’s a simple spritz of sea salt spray (her hair hairstylist recently gave her Fudge) and she’s good to go. When Jodie is in the US, Harry Josh colours her hair, but when she’s back in the UK, John Clark at John Frieda takes over every five weeks. “The amazing thing is you get to try these amazing styles and colours out and it’s so fun to be able to play around like that,” said Jodie. But there’s one thing she’ll never try again: a fringe. “I got one on a whim one time and as soon as I walked out of the salon I thought, What have I done? Every time I had an event, I’d ask the stylists to please do something with it.”

On her everyday makeup look
“I like concealer and a little eyebrow gel so I don’t have to fill in my brows. I use MAC Brow Set in Clear because that stuff does not shift. I also have to have my Kevyn Aucoin eyelash curlers and I also like a nice cream blush, something super natural.”

On her Instagram-famous eyebrows
“My advice is: don’t touch them! I’m lazy with my brows and used to have no eyebrows so I’m scared to do anything to them,” said Jodie. “Actually, I’m very lucky they grew back. I let makeup artists tidy them up as long as they don’t go crazy, but I’d say leave as much as you can. I always used to draw mine on so heavy but I need to feather them slightly. Less is more with eyebrows.”
On her favourite Killing Eve beauty looks
“My favourite was the look from season one, episode three when [Villanelle] killed Bill,” said Jodie. “Even the costume was great, the jigsaw suit and plaits. We were filming in Berlin and she had Doc Martens on. What I imagine about Villanelle is that she is busy and doesn’t have the time to sit there and do her makeup. She’s free and being who she is. She is stripped back. As the seasons went on and the costumes became such a big thing, we had the opportunity to experiment. But she’s simple.”
On her favourite style picks
“You can’t underestimate the power of a good quality T-shirt and jeans,” said Jodie. She continued: “I love Agolde jeans. Mine split on the bum but I ordered them again because they’re so good. PAIGE jeans have great elasticity if you’re a girl who likes your food, like me! My friend also works at New Balance and when there’s a new shoe, she keeps me cool, but I’m very low maintenance.”
And if she’s going to spend her money? “I love a good Joseph jumper or knit, and I’m more of a pants and jacket girl. Recently, when the BAFTAs were virtual, my stylist got me a Duro Olowu dress, which had a low V-neck. When I put that on I thought, Why don’t I wear dresses more? I was obsessed. But it takes a special type of dress to sway me. I also just bought a new pair of black boots from Celine. These ones don’t cut off my calves and I can wear them with jeans and a dress.”

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Free Guy: Jodie Comer On Molotov Girl’s ‘Practical’ Outfit And Boots


One of the most memorable action beats in cinema this year came partway through a bust-up in Birds Of Prey, when Margot Robbie’s Harley Quinn stops mid-brawl to offer Jurnee Smollett’s Black Canary a much-needed hair tie. It was a refreshing moment of practicality in the middle of an action sequence, one that felt real, necessary, and a jab at the impracticalities of most stylised action heroines. Now, get ready for Jodie Comer’s Molotov Girl in Shawn Levy’s video game romp Free Guy – a character who, even in an outlandish open-world RPG, is all about sensible costuming in the name of maximum damage.

Speaking in a joint interview with co-star Ryan Reynolds in the new The Suicide Squad issue of Empire, Comer opened up about the no-nonsense approach to the look of virtual character Molotov Girl – boots, knee-pads, layers, and easily-accessible weapon holsters – as constructed by her gamer character Milly. “I love that this twenty something girl has created an avatar for a video game and it’s not, like, a man’s idea of what she should look like. Milly created it, and it’s practical. Of course, it’s practical!” she says. “I remember when we were still filming and the stunt guys were asking me, ‘Are you in heels for this stunt?’ and I was like, ‘No! She’s in practical, flat boots, just like she should be.’”


As Reynolds points out, Molotov Girl’s look was partially based on Bonnie, of Bonnie and Clyde. “At first the character was written as this kind of punk-rock, nondescript sort of goth character and it just felt so dated,” he says. “So in order to make the character less dated, we… well, we went even further back and based her on Bonnie Parker. She had an iconic look, very practical, very chic.”

Read the full conversation between Comer and Reynolds in The Suicide Squad issue of Empire, on sale Thursday 29 October and available to order online now. Free Guy is currently expected in UK cinemas from 11 December.

Jodie Comer Nominated for Lead Actress In A Drama Series

We have some fantastic news today! The Emmy awards were announced and Jodie has been nominated for Lead Actress in a Drama Series for her role as Villanelle in Killing Eve Alongside with her two Killing Eve co-stars Sandra Oh was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series alongside Fiona Shaw Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series! and Killing Eve itself was nominated for Outstanding Drama Series, big congrats to Jodie her fellow castmates, and the Killing Eve team! Fingers crossed award season will be in their favor!

‘Killing Eve’ Season 4 Shoot Delayed

Deadline- Production on Season 4 of BBC America’s Killing Eve has been postponed without a clear return date as the show’s complicated European shoot schedule has been hammered by coronavirus.

Deadline can reveal that Sid Gentle Films was originally aiming to get cameras rolling on the Emmy and Golden Globe-winning drama in August, as it has with the past three series. But the company has now abandoned the plans and is yet to set a restart date for later this year.

The main reason for the delay is because Killing Eve is a jigsaw of European location shoots, many of which have been rendered difficult at this time due to the pandemic. Producers are being tight-lipped about where Season 4 will take Villanelle (Jodie Comer) and Eve Polastri (Sandra Oh), but past locations include Amsterdam, Barcelona, Bucharest and Tuscany.

There have also been some industry rumors that Oh has been reluctant to fly into Europe to begin shooting, but this was downplayed by a source close to the show. One prominent British drama producer acknowledged, however, that getting Hollywood talent on a plane is not going to be straightforward for anyone right now.

The Killing Eve production delay will almost certainly push back its premiere date in 2021. The show works on a fairly fast turnaround basis, shooting in late summer and through the autumn, before premiering in early April on BBC America.

A spokesman for the show said: “Killing Eve shoots across multiple European locations. Due to the uncertainty of the world as a result of Covid-19, no shooting schedules for Killing Eve season four have been locked in at this point and there are various scenarios in play.”

Killing Eve has been in the headlines in recent weeks. Writer Kayleigh Llewellyn tweeted a picture of the show’s all-white writers’ room, prompting a social media pile-on over the show’s lack of diversity. Oh herself has also talked about her experiences of working in the UK. “Sometimes it would be me and 75 white people and I have not come from that,” she said. “The development of people behind the camera is very slow in the UK.

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